What disability benefits are available to disabled adults?

Adults with disabilities may be able to receive Social Security disability benefits based on their parent’s earnings and contributions.

Minnesota residents who find themselves unable to work and earn a living need to know what types of assistance may be available to them during these times. In addition to the need for financial benefits for oneself, there can be times when such benefits are required for one's child. When that child is a legal adult, however, parents may feel they have no ability to secure such help but that is incorrect.

As explained by the PBS News Hour, some adult children with disabilities are able to file claims for and receive Social Security disability benefits based upon their parents' employment contributions.

Requirements the disabled child must meet

The Social Security Administration manages the approval and distribution of all Social Security disability benefits, including those to adult disabled children. In order to qualify for these benefits, the child must meet specific criteria . These include the following:

· The child must be at least 18 years of age.

· The child must have a condition that meets the definition for being disabled.

· The disability must have begun before the child reached the age of 22.

· If employed, the child may not earn more than a certain amount.

· If married, the child's spouse should also be disabled.

The child may be either a biological or adopted child of the parent whose benefits are being requested. In some situations, a grandchild, stepchild or step grandchild may be eligible for these benefits as well.

When evaluating any income currently earned by the adult disabled child, some expenses may be able to be deducted. These include transportation costs to and from a job, for example.

The criteria for being identified as disabled are the same for an adult disabled child as for anyone seeking Social Security disability. They include the expectation that a condition last for a minimum of 12 months and may even be terminal. There are some conditions that immediately qualify a person as disabled. Other people may be deemed disabled based upon their ability or inability to work among other factors.

Requirements the parent must meet

The parent must have worked and paid contributions to Social Security in order for the child to request the parent's benefits. The parent must be currently receiving Social Security retirement benefits or have already passed away. The child of living parent who is still working and not claiming Social Security may not be able to receive the adult disabled child benefits.

Anyone interested in learning if their adult disabled child might qualify for Social Security benefits under their earnings should talk to a lawyer. This can give Minnesota residents the most comprehensive understanding of the steps involved in making an application.