August 2019 Archives

Housing and Disability Benefits

A constant source of confusion for many disability claimants is that they often qualify to apply for two different types of benefits: Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income.

It's difficult to cope with war

Soldiers know what they're signing up for when they join the military, but that does not mean that they're ready to deal with the true experience of war, either mentally or emotionally. It's hard to say anyone is. War is very difficult, stressful and traumatic. Even a just war to protect the innocent, where the solider knows they are doing the right thing and feels proud of what they have accomplished, can leave someone with mental scars they carry for life. That's just the nature of war itself.

Successful cancer treatment could leave you with a disability

Cancer can be a devastating disease, and you may be disabled for the rest of your life regardless of the outcome of the treatment. Just going through chemo and everything else really takes a toll. You need an incredible amount of rest, you may feel weak and sick all of the time, and you may find that you absolutely cannot hold down a job.

Can my Benefits be Cut-Off?

The short answer is "yes". There are several developments that can trigger the cessation of either SSI or SSDI benefits. Benefits can be ceased if a recipient returns to work. Individuals receiving SSDI can become ineligible if they are exceeding the substantial gainful activity level (SGA) level of income. The substantial gainful activity threshold income for a non-blind individual is currently $1220 per month. However, an individual receiving SSDI will be eligible for what is known as a Trial Work Period. During this period, the recipient may earn more than SGA for a period of 9 months without causing their benefits to be cut-off. In fact, there is also an "extended period of eligibility" beyond the 9 month trial work period. This period can last 36 months. The recipient's income will be examined monthly during the extended period.

Can My Child Receive Benefits if I am Approved for Disability?

The are two types of benefits that fall under the broader umbrella of "disability benefits". SSI benefits are paid out to individual who are determined to be disabled, but have not paid in enough to Social Security through their payroll withholdings to be eligible for SSDI benefits. SSI benefits are also reserved for individual who have under $2,000.00 in counted assets. If you are receiving only SSI benefits, your child will not be eligible for separate benefits based on your status as an SSI recipient. However, the child of an individual receiving SSDI benefits (benefits based on quarterly credits accrued from working) may also be eligible to receive benefits, notwithstanding any disability of their own.

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Contact us online or call our offices directly at 888-351-0427 for a free case evaluation. All cases are taken on contingency, meaning there are no fees until we recover benefits for you.

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In Minnesota, we handle Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) claims. Throughout the nation, we handle SSDI applications and appeals for people from Ohio to Kansas, North Dakota to Texas and everywhere in between.

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Midwest Disability, P.A.
408 Northdale Boulevard Northwest
Coon Rapids, MN 55448

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