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A doctor’s note can help your disability claim

One of the main things that you need to present when asking for Social Security benefits for an illness is the medical records to prove that you do have that illness. This shows that you have seen medical professionals who have made an accurate diagnosis. You’re not basing your claim off of assumptions or your own personal feelings about the disease.

When you get this, you may also want to get a letter from your physician that lays out what they think about your condition. They may note that the condition:

  • Is severe
  • Limits your mobility
  • Limits your daily activities
  • Makes it impossible to work completely
  • Makes it impossible to work for a sustained time period

These examples come from a sample letter that can be used by people with MS (multiple sclerosis). As such, they may not apply to every illness in the same way. But the example still shows how the doctor can essentially testify on your behalf, letting those making a decision on your case know that you really are disabled.

That letter is provided by the National MS Society. While it is helpful, they do make a point to tell you that it’s just a sample and not intended for actual use. It can guide you and your physician as you create a personalized letter that applies to your case.

This does show what type of proof and evidence can be used, though, and it demonstrates what the SSA is looking for. If you’re applying for benefits, make sure you are well-aware of the legal steps you need to take.

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