Midwest Disability, P.A. Midwest Disability, P.A. Midwest Disability, P.A.

Midwest Disability, P.A.'s Blog

Don't let disability myths get in your way

There are many myths about disability benefits and being able to work while receiving benefits. Some believe there's no chance for you to work while on benefits, while others believe it's possible to collect benefits and work. The reality is that you can work as long as it is within the guidelines of the Social Security Administration (SSA).

The SSA regularly checks on your condition to make sure you still qualify for benefits. As long as you do, you may want to consider working up to the allowed amount. In 2018, you can earn up to $1,180 per month in addition to your disability paycheck before you will see a reduction in your benefits. If, at any time, you lose your Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits because you are earning too much, you will still retain Medicare for up to 93 months and Medicaid will also continue. Even after you're unable to receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you may still qualify for Medicaid based on your case.

Mental health conditions may qualify for Social Security benefits

Not all disabilities are obvious, and not all disabilities are physical. There are many mental disabilities that impact people in the United States. These individuals may not be able to work, just like someone with a physical impairment may be unable to work.

It's important that people who struggle with mental health conditions also have the option to obtain Social Security Disability (SSD). These individuals also need medical treatment and financial support while they work to get back to a healthy state.

Social Security wait times delay disability benefits

When there aren't enough people to help with Social Security claims, time becomes the enemy for victims who need benefits. It's tiring to know you deserve and need benefits but you have to wait time and time again for the process that could finally bring you relief.

A recent report discussed how federal disability programs are now on high-risk lists in Government Accountability offices. The reality is that the Social Security Administration (SSA) is so short-staffed that it's nearly impossible for people to get approved for disability in a reasonable amount of time.

What if My Symptoms Come and Go?

Some people have health problems that result in "good days" and "bad days" in terms of their symptoms. This is often the case for individuals with gout, arthritis, fibromyalgia, different mental health impairments, and a number of other disabling conditions. These individuals may be capable of performing a range of work on good days but find themselves completely debilitated on their bad days. Even if your disabling symptoms are not constantly present or constantly severe, you may still be eligible to receive SSI or SSDI benefits if you experience flare-ups or bad days every month that prevent you from working on those days.

The Importance of Attending Your Hearing

As you near the scheduled hearing date in your case, your attorney or case manager will ask you to arrive at the hearing location at least a half hour prior to your hearing. It is very important that you try your best to arrive early. You may have additional questions for your attorney or your attorney may wish to speak with you again before your hearing. It is also a good idea to give yourself some extra time in case of traffic issues or difficulty finding the hearing location.

What are Acceptable Medical Sources?

There are a variety of medical providers who treat medical conditions. However, the Social Security Administration maintains a specific list of medical professionals they consider Acceptable Medical Sources. They include: licensed physicians (both Medical and Osteopathic Doctors), Licensed or Certified Psychologists, School Psychologists can opine on learning and intellectual disabilities, Licensed Optometrists, Licensed Podiatrists, Qualified Speech Language Pathologists, Licensed Physician Assistants for claims filed after March 27, 2017, Licensed Audiologists, and Licensed Advanced Practice Registered Nurses for claims filed after March 27, 2017 (there are 4 kinds of Advanced Nurse Practitioners: 1. Certified Nurse Midwife, 2. Nurse Practitioner, 3. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist, and 4. Clinical Nurse Specialists).

Do I have to File Taxes on My Disability Payments?

The answers is, it depends. It depends on your marital status and household income. If you are a single person receiving disability benefits exclusively, you don't necessarily have to file taxes. It is unlikely you have reached the threshold, which is $25,000. However, some years there are stimulus packages and other tax benefits available for people who file taxes so it might be in your best interest to file taxes. If you receive disability benefits and work part-time, you might have to file taxes. Generally, if your income is more than $25,000 you need to file and pay taxes. You won't have to pay taxes on all of the disability payment you have received, but you will pay on a portion of what you have received.

On The Record (OTR) Decisions

On August 9, 2007, Social Security Administration issued a rule authorizing some attorney advisors to review case files and issue fully favorable decisions "on the record" (OTR), where the evidence in its entirety warrants disability. The practice was originally passed as a temporary measure to provide more timely service to claimants waiting for a hearing before an administrative law judge. However, Social Security Administration has seen success with the program and continues to extend the rule beyond its expiration date. The current rule has been extended through August 3, 2018.

Social Security budget increase to help those in need

Every time you receive a paycheck, you'll notice that a portion is paid out to the Social Security Administration (SSA). If you get hurt and are unable to work, paying into that system is what gives you access to disability coverage. When you need it most, Social Security is supposed to be the security net you need. It should only require an application, which you'd expect to get approved quickly.

The problem with Social Security disability (SSD) is that many people have to wait months or years to be approved for the very benefits they've earned over time. Presently, people wait up to 600 days, on average, for an approval or denial letter. If they're denied, people have to appeal for the coverage they need, adding many months or years to their already too-long wait.

Social Security Disability is there when you need it

Social Security Disability (SSD) is a benefit that helps many people when they're unable to work or cannot work to the extent they used to. With studies showing that approximately one in four 20-year-olds will become disabled prior to their 67th birthdays, it's more important than ever to have Social Security Disability benefits as a safety net for the public.

To obtain SSD, you must have worked long enough to earn enough credits. This benefit is only paid to those who have limited resources and income, so you will need to present your case to the Social Security Administration (SSA). It's true that many people are denied the first time they apply, even though they qualify later. That's why some people choose to work with attorneys early on, so they can guarantee that their documents are in order.

MIDWEST DISABILITY office locations

Midwest Disability, P.A.
408 Northdale Boulevard Northwest
Coon Rapids, MN 55448
Toll Free: 888-351-0427
Fax:763-862-7521
Coon Rapids Law Office Map

Super Lawyers The National Trial Lawyers | Top 100 Trial Lawyers