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What are specific military disability benefits?

Veterans who have suffered disabilities may qualify for a tax-free set of benefits called Disability Compensation. This compensation is provided to those who are hurt or who suffer diseases as a result of active military service. You may also be able to obtain compensation for injuries that occur post service, but they must be related to military service in some way. For example, a person who is shot in the military may later require surgery to amputate a limb because of infection. If the infection from the wound occurs after service, it may still be connected to service and make you eligible for compensation.

Another kind of benefit to look into the Special Monthly Compensation. Known as SMC, this compensation is also tax-free and is paid to veterans, their surviving spouses, parents or spouses. This is paid to those who require a higher rate of compensation due to a specific disability.

What's the reality of Social Security Disability?

There are many things you should know about Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits, like the fact that around one out of four of today's 20-year-olds will end up facing a disability before they reach the age of 67. With such a high likelihood of injury, it's vital for SSD to exist.

The program provides inflation-protected income to those who are unable to work because of a disability. However, you must first become eligible for SSD. You'll have to have worked in Social Security-covered employment for around 10 years if you are disabled at 60, whereas you only need a minimum of 1.5 years if you are disabled earlier in life, like in your 20s. You also have to show that you worked prior to your injury. For example, if you're disabled at 30, you should be able to show that you worked at least half of the last 10 years.

How much can you get in Supplemental Security Income?

If you're interested in obtaining Supplemental Security Income (SSI) along with your current Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits, you may be interested in how much they pay out presently. Like with Social Security benefits, the maximum federal SSI also increases when there is inflation of the dollar in the United States.

In 2018, the increase was 2 percent in inflation, which means the previous year's amount is no longer accurate or what you'd receive if you applied for SSI. In 2018, the annual maximum a single eligible individual may receive is $9,007.46. Monthly, it works out to $750.

Deeming Spousal Income

There are a few different kinds of disability benefits available through the Social Security Administration. One of the programs is Supplemental Security Income. Supplemental Security Income is also known as SSI or T16 benefits. SSI is designed the help blind and disabled people who have little to no income and limited assets. This is different from Social Security Disability Insured Benefits. Insured Benefits require you to pay Social Security taxes. Supplemental Security Income does not require that a person pay into Social Security taxes. It does, however, have income and asset limitations. And the income and asset limitations apply to spouses.

What is a Composite Job?

When you apply for social security disability, the Social Security Administration gathers information about what kind of work you have done in the past. This information is gathered in a few different ways. When you apply, you will receive a form called a Work History form. It is important that you fill that out completely so the Social Security Administration has accurate information about what you did in the past. Social Security will also get information about your earnings. They will determine if the work you did in the past was done at substantial gainful activity.

What Happens at a Social Security Disability Hearing?

After your application for disability benefits has been denied by the Social Security Administration (typically twice, but it depends on your state) you will be provided the opportunity to appear before an administrative law judge. Your judge will not have been involved in issuing previous denials in your case. Prior to your hearing, the judge will have examined the medical records that you and your representative have submitted to the Social Security Administration.

Obstacles in Claims Based on Mental Health Impairments

Disability benefits are available to individuals that are unable to work full-time due to a severe mental impairment. Examples of such impairments include depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Although you may have been diagnosed with such a disorder and may be unable to work as a result, such a case can still be a challenge. Part of this challenge lies in the quality of the evidence documenting your mental health problems. While physical disabilities can be shown to be severe through irrefutable evidence in the form of x-rays or MRIs, mental health issues cannot be demonstrated as unambiguously through medical evidence. A doctor may have diagnosed you with a certain mental illness, but his diagnosis may be based in large part upon your own subjective claims about symptoms like anxiety or depression. The best way to overcome this obstacle is to create a consistent and compelling medical record. This can be accomplished by continuing to follow-up with your providers.

3 tips for a faster disability benefits approval

If you're applying for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), it probably has not slipped by you that it can be difficult to get. Many people are denied the first time they apply, because their documents are not in order or because of other issues. Fortunately, there are some tips that can help you apply for, and receive, these benefits the first time.

With these tips, you can increase your chance of being approved the first time you apply. Here are three tips to consider.

MIDWEST DISABILITY office locations

Midwest Disability, P.A.
408 Northdale Boulevard Northwest
Coon Rapids, MN 55448
Toll Free: 888-351-0427
Fax:763-862-7521
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