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How much is spent on Social Security Disability each year?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) admits that workplace injuries and illnesses result in many of the disabilities seen in the United States today. As a result, it’s important for workers’ compensation programs to run in workplaces and to have other safety nets for people who suffer injuries at work. Workers’ compensation programs provide close to $60 billion in benefits each year to those who suffer illnesses and injuries.

On top of this, Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) pays out another $95 billion, as of the 2008 reports. These two systems work together to make sure those who suffer a workplace injury receive medical care and support as they recover.

When is SSDI available to workers?

It does not become available until a worker is found to have a stable disability or one that will last 12 months or longer. If it is an injury that will result in death, such as a terminal illness, then this also qualifies the individual for SSDI. SSDI covers a narrower scope of injuries than workers’ compensation, and it’s not intended to cover every person who has to take time off work. If you’ll miss less than a year of work, you may be entitled to temporary disability or state benefits instead of the federal SSDI benefits.

Permanent partial disability benefits are also available for some who are injured. These benefits are generally available through the states and rely on current laws and regulations. Your attorney can speak with you specifically about the current laws if you plan to apply for permanent partial disability benefits or SSDI.

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