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Proving your disability is a must to obtain compensation

When you suffer an injury, you may not initially think that it will lead down the path to Social Security Disability (SSD). Usually, people think that they will recover, and in many cases, that’s true.

Unfortunately, some are unable to fully recover and may need assistance moving forward. That’s what SSD benefits are for. If you are hurt on the job or off, you can seek these benefits to help you pay your bills and get a monthly check. The amount you’ll get will depend on how much you’ve worked and your average income.

How do you obtain SSD?

To get SSD, you need to prove that you have an impairment that prevents you from working enough to support yourself. The best way to prove it is by obtaining a letter from your medical provider and by turning in medical documents that support your claim. Copies of the medical records, which may include laboratory findings, X-rays or other important information, should be included with your claim.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) requires that the disability is listed in its impairment guidelines or that you have the functional equivalent of one that is listed and recognized by the administration. If not, then you may not be able to receive benefits even if you’re in a position where you need them.

It can be hard to obtain benefits, which is why it’s so vital for individuals to get the application right the first time. Reducing and eliminating errors gives you the best chance of an approval on your first application.

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