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Hearing loss doesn’t automatically qualify as a disability

People who have hearing loss often find that doing even basic tasks is difficult. The challenges that they experience will often become more pronounced as the hearing loss becomes greater. For some, this might lead to them having significant trouble earning a living.

It might surprise some people, however, to know that it is difficult to get Social Security Disability payments based on hearing loss unless your case meets very specific circumstances.

When is hearing loss considered disabling?

There are three points that a person can meet that should qualify them for disability benefits:

  • An average hearing threshold below 60 decibels when a bone conduction test is done
  • An average hearing threshold below 90 decibels when an air conduction test is done
  • A failure to repeat at least 40% of the words given in a recognition test

Other factors in the application will likely come into the picture when you apply for disability. One thing that you must remember in these cases is that even having to use a hearing aid isn’t enough to qualify you for disability. Hearing aids don’t meet the criteria under the Social Security Administration’s guidelines or the Americans with Disabilities Act.

You also need to know that any other medical conditions you may have will also be factored into your application for benefits. You can qualify for SSDI benefits based on the total of your limitations.

Should you get help with your SSDI claim?

Because of the complexities of these situations, you should discuss your case with someone familiar with the SSA requirements for disability. This may help you as you try to navigate through the application process. Many applications are denied at first, and you’d have to appeal if this happens to you and you still want to pursue the benefits.

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