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Midwest Disability, P.A. - Social Security Disability
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Denied for Social Security disability? Answer these questions

Having a disabling condition can put much of a person’s life into question. Individuals may wonder whether their condition will get worse, whether they will lose more abilities than they already have, whether they will struggle financially and much more. Often, financial concerns hit a peak for individuals with a disability because they fear they will not be able to work and, as a result, not be able to pay for their needs. Often, many apply for Social Security disability benefits, but almost just as often, applications are denied. 

If a person applies for SSDI and receives a denial from the Social Security Administration, it is understandable to wonder why. Though it is important to keep in mind that the majority of first-time applicants do receive a denial, it could help an applicant to better understand his or her specific reason for not being approved. Fortunately, an assessment of one’s circumstances could help. 

A few sample questions a person may want to answer after receiving a denial from the SSA for disability benefits include the following: 

  • Does the applicant currently have a job? If an applicant is working and earning more than $1,310 on average a month, the SSA will consider that person as having substantial gainful activity and, therefore, not in need of benefits. 
  • Is the disabling condition on the SSA’s list of approved conditions? If not, the SSA may deny an application. However, it does not mean that an unlisted condition will not be approved if sufficient evidence of disability is provided. 
  • Can the applicant perform any type of work, even if it is not what he or she did previously? Just because a person’s disability prevents him or her from doing the same work, it does not always mean that the person cannot do other work. 

Of course, each person’s situation is unique, and various factors could contribute to whether the SSA approves someone for Social Security disability benefits. In the event that individuals are denied, they may want to remember that they can continue to work toward the benefits they need. In some cases, having professional assistance with the process could be useful. 

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